See the person not the disability


Can I just say that again- see the person not the disability. Now I'm sure you would have heard this quote at some point. I know I have, but that might just be because of my love for quotes in the first place. However (never straight forward is it!) this quote I have to disagree with.
I always like to say that cerebral palsy is one piece from the thousand piece puzzle which makes up me. Therefore part of me. However I feel this quote is trying to separate the two, and that you can't be a person if you have a disability. 
Who knows- probably reading far too much in to this (English literature student alert!). 
I mean it's not something to be embarrassed about, or something that you should hide, if that's even possible to a certain extent. Normally if you are relaxed by the whole thing then so is everyone else- taking out the anomalies here. 
In a way it is true though. A disability shouldn't be the first thing you see/ think about when you see a person because it's a small part of them and their personality. Unfortunately that isn't always the case, because let’s be honest, we all do, but then isn't that the same for anyone who is different- you will notice that first. Notice that quirk that makes them stand out but is still just a part of who they are? 
We all have our own ‘image’ shall we say. You know, the way we look and everything. How we betray ourselves to the world. We just need to remember that you don’t choose to have a disability and therefore if it is considered as part of the image that we show then why should we be judged on that or be known for that?
I guess as long as you don't prejudge them on that then that's alright? At the end of the day, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and I guess this is just mine. A disability of some kind is not as rare as you would first imagine. 
See each person as them, everything about them is one piece of their puzzle.

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